​​​​​​​Bulletin Announcements​

Reflections on Laudato Si’ - What is happening to our common home?

“This is the way human beings contrive to feed their self-destructive vices: trying not to see them, trying not to acknowledge them, delaying the important decisions and pretending that nothing will happen” (Laudato Si, 59).

  • When I encounter something difficult or unjust, what is my reaction? 
  • What negative consequences could arise for ourselves or for others when we choose to ignore a problem?

To view the full encyclical or for additional resources, visit: www.archtoronto.org/laudatosi




Reflections on Laudato Si’ – The Gospel of Creation

“This responsibility for God’s earth means that human beings, endowed with intelligence, must respect the laws of nature and the delicate equilibria existing between the creatures of this world, for ‘he commanded and they were created; and he established them for ever and ever; he fixed their bounds and he set a law which cannot pass away’ (Ps 148:5b-6)” (Laudato Si, 68). 

  • Have I been acting responsibly toward God’s creation? 
  • How does our humanity set us apart from other elements of creation?
To view the full encyclical or for additional resources, visit: www.archtoronto.org/laudatosi



Reflections on Laudato Si’ – The human roots of the ecological crisis

“When we fail to acknowledge as part of reality the worth of a poor person, a human embryo, a person with disabilities […] it becomes difficult to hear the cry of nature itself; everything is connected” (Laudato Si, 117).
  • Do I acknowledge the worth and dignity of all people?
  • How do I care for God’s creation, especially the most vulnerable from the first moment of conception to natural death?
“Never has humanity had such power over itself, yet nothing ensures that [knowledge] will be used wisely, particularly when we consider how it is currently being used” (Laudato Si, 104).
  • Have I been a responsible steward of my gift of knowledge? How can I make informed and responsible decisions, reflecting my faith, each day?
  • How can we discern the best use of technology so that is does not consume us and damage our personal relationships?
To view the full encyclical or for additional resources, visit: www.archtoronto.org/laudatosi




Reflections on Laudato Si’ – Integral Ecology

“The analysis of environmental problems cannot be separated from the analysis of human, family, work-related and urban contexts, and of how individuals relate to themselves (Laudato Si, 141). We are not faced with two separate crises, one environmental and the other social, but rather one complex crisis which is both social and environmental” (Laudato Si, 139).
  • We are a society focused on consumption. How do I resist the temptation to accumulate material possessions? Do I make time for meaningful conversation, prayer and authentic relationships? 
  • What are some of the ways I see an overlap between my life and environment in which I live? How does my environment affect my overall well-being?
 “If everything is related, then the health of a society’s institutions affects the environment and the quality of human life. ‘Every violation of solidarity and civic friendship harms the environment’” (Laudato Si, 142).

  • Do I acknowledge the effect my actions have on others, on society and on the environment?
  • Think of a decision you made recently and reflect on three ways that decision may have affected the environment or the lives of others.
To view the full encyclical or for additional resources, visit: www.archtoronto.org/laudatosi




Reflections on Laudato Si’ - Lines of approach and action

“Interdependence obliges us to think of one world with a common plan […] A global consensus is essential for confronting the deeper problems, which cannot be resolved by unilateral actions on the part of individual countries” (Laudato Si, 164).
  • What does it mean to be a “global citizen”? 
  • What are some ways I can support my local government leaders as they look for sustainable long-term global solutions to environmental problems?
To view the full encyclical or for additional resources, visit: www.archtoronto.org/laudatosi




Reflections on Laudato Si’– Ecological education and spirituality

​“An awareness of the gravity of today’s cultural and ecological crisis must be translated into new habits. Many people know that our current progress and the mere amassing of things and pleasures are not enough to give meaning and joy to the human heart, yet they feel unable to give up what the market sets before them” (Laudato Si, 209).
  • How am I being called to change my habits to resist the culture of materialism? 
  • What are the greatest sources of joy in my life? How can I share those moments with others?
“Ecological education can take place in a variety of settings: at school, in families, in the media, in catechesis and elsewhere” (Laudato Si, 213).

  • Am I making an effort to learn more about ecology and act on what I’ve learned? 
  • How can I share important truths regarding ecology with others in my sphere of influence?
To view the full encyclical or for additional resources, visit: www.archtoronto.org/laudatosi​